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with 64 votes. we passed the hurricane sandy emergency relief bill also in bipartisan fashion, with 62 votes. we had open debate, we had discussions, we had amendments, and we passed legislation. particularly we passed by a powerful bipartisan vote of 89-8, a bill that avoided tax increases for 99% of americans and extended emergency unemployment benefits for another year and protected us from the fiscal cliff. when it comes to legislating, the senate actually has a pretty strong bipartisan record. how did those senate bills do on the house side? well, the house couldn't pass its own highway bill. congress has been doing highway bills since the eisenhower years. this isn't rocket science. the house couldn't do one. the best the house of representatives could do was to pass a short-term extension that allowed some of their members to get to conference on the senate bill. but they took no bill into conference because they couldn't pass one. even then they delayed the conference negotiations and they cost the united states of america an entire summer construction season for highway constr
year which also provided much-needed relief funds for hurricane sandy victims. that was a bipartisan bill. it was supported by senate republicans and democrats alike. but the republicans in the house regrettably gutted the bill and sent back legislation that explicitly cut out wildfire relief. in that context, let me make one point absolutely clear. this is an emergency. some people have questioned the need for funding and have asked why we wouldn't limit dollars to just hurricane sandy saer kwras like the bill -- hurricane sandy areas. the short answer is it is the fiscally smart thing to do, the right thing to do, and the fair thing to do. this bill is an emergency appropriations bill for all national disasters, not just hurricane sandy. it is our best hope of seeing wildfire relief. i emphatically note that the colorado emergencies occurred before hurricane sandy and the west should not have to continue to wait. very few emergency supplemental bills pass congress. this bill is passing now, and it should include aid for colorado and other states across our country. we as americans,
from connecticut gave a detailed account of the sandy hook shooting last month. also testifying, philadelphia mayor michael nutter, the mother of the victim of the arizonan shooting two years ago and police chief from minnesota. >> good afternoon, everyone. thank you very much for joining us on this very solemn and important occasion for the american people. just over a month ago our nation was shocked and horrified by the news of the shooting at sandy hook elementary school in newtown connecticut. 20 children and six educators were taken from us at gunpoint. an act of senseless incomprehensible violence struck at the heart of our families and schools and communities across the country. earlier this month, shortly after newtown, all members of congress to get both to protect and defend the constitution and the american people. to protect and defend, that is our first responsibility to read today leaders of the house democratic caucus have come together to fulfill that duty to confront the challenge of some violence in our society to enact and insure the safety and security of ou
this discussion, i'll just tell you one very personal anecdote. three days before the sandy hook shooting, i was in denver, colorado, on personal business. and i was driving through the denver suburbs, and i passed into aurora rah, colorado, and saw the sign and thought to myself -- as journalists often do -- oh, my god, this just disappeared from our landscape. it happened not that long ago in which a young man, now appears to be utterly deranged, b went into a movie theater and began shooting down people with an assault weapon. and it went away. the not part of the presidential debate, it was not part of the fabric of our lives, it was not part of the daily journalistic diet. so on that wednesday night i e-mailed the producer of the "meet the press" show that was coming up on that sunday in which they would be talking about big ideas that america needs to be thinking about. and i said you should put shooting at the top of the list. we have been through aurora, the sikh temple, the oregon shopping mall, think about this, this is before we got to sandy hook. in newtown. we'd had a time of ab
of drought which people don't -- people underestimate droughts. drought probably cost more than sandy will in the long run because of the public sector. fewer games, and sandy is like, was a hurricane and then just whatever you want to call after that, that's a big debate. but we're talking about manhattan, want you to think about this. people are talking at sea level rise in inches, maybe a foot over decades. sandy produced storm surge of three to four meters, or over 12 feet, in one of the most densely populated areas in the united states. and everybody says, i didn't think this could happen. i'm like, well, i've got pictures in the '30s when they were flooding the subways back then. it just doesn't happen very frequently. we had -- all of their imaging equipment in the basement. it makes sense when you don't deal with storms every year, it's much easier to shield, it's isolated, and it's a great space putting that type of equipment. now if you're getting hurricanes every five or six years you wouldn't have built there. if you hadn't had a storm since the series of any magnitude, ma
sandy relief efforts. we'll have live coverage of the senate when they return at 2:15 eastern here on c-span2. going to take you live next acrosstown in washington to the democratic national committee and their winter meeting about to get underway. they're going to hear from democratic national committee chairman, debbie debbie wasserman schultz. it should get underway shortly here on c-span2. democratic national committee chairman debbie wasserman schultz will speak shortly talking about the democratic party's agenda and challenges ahead for the 113th congress. we'll have live coverage when she gets underway on c-span2. a look at the agenda ahead in transportics with secretary ray a are hood who called on congress to pass a five-year long-term transportation bill. [applause] >> hello, everybody. thank you very much. good noontime to all of you and thank you for including me again in your program. i want to ask all of our dot team gathered for lunch to stand up and be recognized. all dot stand up and be recognized. [applause] thank you all. thank you. i know that trb wouldn't be what it
change, and unimaginable human tragedies like sandy hook elementary. but we also bear witness to rapid breakthroughs in technology, medicine, and the fundamental understanding of our universe. every day i am left in awe at how much we are able to achieve, and heartbroken over the tragedies that we have had to endure. we truly live in extraordinary times. we also live in an extraordinary state, filled with extraordinary people. where the world sees uncertainty, we washingtonians see opportunity. and we all feel a profound responsibility to our children and our grandchildren. we have a spirit of innovation here in washington that has changed the world, from aerospace to software to e-commerce. and you know what? we are not done. [applause] a new world economy is emerging from the depths of this recession, and while its contours and relationships are not fully understood to us, we do know two things. first, with our uniquely powerful fusion of values and talents, washington state has the potential to lead the next wave of world-changing innovations. second, the world will not wait for us.
to make whole the victims of hurricane sandy. each of these initiatives passed the senate on a bipartisan basis but was left to languish by the house. the senate will continue to help our fellow americans to help with hurricane sandy before another similar disaster strikes. hundreds of thousands of homes and businesses were destroyed in new york, new jersey and new england and tens of thousands of americans were left homeless by this destructive storm. we have a responsibility to aid our country men as they rebuild their lives and communities as we have after terrible floods, fires and storms in other parts of our nation. once we complete that vital legislation, the senate will take action to make this institution that we all love -- the united states senate -- work more effectively. we'll consider changes in the senate rules. because of this -- because this matter warrants additional debate, we will follow the precedent set in 2005 and again in 2011 to reserve the right of all senators to propose changes in the senate rules and we will explicitly not act in acquiescing in carrying out al
we begin this discussioncomes out to you on personal anecdote. three days before the sandy hook shooting, as in denver colorado on personal business and i was driving to the denver suburbs and i passed into oruro, colorado and saw the sign that to myself, as journalists often do, my god, this just disappeared from our landscape. it happened not that long ago and a young man now appears to be utterly deranged, went to the theater and began shooting people with an assault weapon. and it went away. it is not part of a presidential debate, not part of the daily journalistic diet. so that wednesday night, i e-mailed the reduced their of the "meet the press" show coming up on that sunday in which they would be talking about big ideas that needs to be thinking about. and i said you should put shooting at the top of the list. we've been through oruro, the sikh temple, the shopping mall. think about this. this is before we got to sandy hook in it. we had a time of absolute carnage in america to see nothing going on in chicago in most urban areas around america. a hundred six homicides in
'll tell you one very personal and it do. three days before the sandy hook shooting us in denver, colorado on personal business and writing to the denver suburbs and i passed into a rural, colorado and saw the sign and thought to myself, as journalists often do, this just disappeared from our landscape. it happened not that long ago in which a young man who appears to be utterly to range, went into a movie theater and began shooting people with an assault weapon. and it went away. it was not part of the presidential debate coming apart at the fabric of our lives, not to do the diet. so on that wednesday night, i e-mailed the producer of the "meet the press" show coming up on that sunday in which they would be talking about big ideas america needs to be thinking about. and i said, you should put shooting at the top of the list. we have been through aurora, the sikh temple, the oregon shopping mall. this was before we got to sandy hook and newton. we had a time of absolute carnage in america to say nothing of what was going on in the city of chicago in most urban areas around america. 506 ho
of you are helping to lead efforts to heed and to honor the lessons of sandy hook elementary school and the realization that unacceptable levels of gun violence plague our cities and towns every day. now, this unspeakable tragedy, but also the individual tragedies that take place on your streets all too often and all too often unnoticed, stand as stark reminders of our shared responsibility to address not just the end dem cantic of gun-related crimes and the ongoing need for vigorous enforcement of our laws, but also the underlying conditions that give rise to gun violence. throughout our history the overwhelming majority of american gun owners have been responsible, law-abiding citizens. yet we have repeatedly seen in the most tragic ways how easy it can be for dangerous people to acquire and to wreak havoc with deadly weapons. now, although there's no single solution that can bring a decisive end to this senseless violence, it's incumbent upon each of us to try. and it's time to consider what common steps we can take together to save lives. you know, this means doing everything th
to come in and settle themselves down. super storm sandy, drought on agriculture, wildfires, the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear reactor accident in japan last year, haiti earthquake, the list is long and worrying. in 20 # 11, we had more disasters in the united states costing more than a billion dollars than ever. in fact, we had more expensive disasters, but not quite as many in 2012. the drought and the super storm were hugely, hugely expensive. disasters are happening with greater frequency, greater severity, and absolutely with many, many greater costs. we ray -- we are here over the next three days to work across traditional boundaries to connect scientists of all stripes with practitioners, with policymakers from the international to the local level with conservation organizations, with cooperations, and it is our belief that only, and i want to emphasize "only" by working together can we solve these challenges that face us. the costs are the just not financial, but as we tragically know, many, many lives are lost in these disasters so if we can come up with just one
the victims of hurricane sandy. these were debated in the senate. we have to take prevent costumes and preventions before another hurricane sandy. thousands of homes and businesses were destroyed in new york, new jersey, and new england, and 10,000 americans were left homeless. we have a responsibility to rebuild their lives and their communities. as we have done with those who are victims of fire and other natural disasters and other parts of the nation. we will consider changes to the senate rules. because this is a matter of additional debate, we reserve the right of all senators to oppose changes to the senate rules. it is my intention that the senate rules are continued and allow these important rules discussion to continue. i'm hopeful am cautiously optimistic that the republicans and democrats can reach an agreement to manage the senate more effectively in coming months. >> republican leader? >> mr. president, i want to start by co want to start by congratulating president obama on his inauguration. presidential inauguration to always time for the country to come together. w
department for the extraordinary performance during and after superstorm sandy. what a sea change, no pun intended, from the response to katrina. before engaging in a conversation let me say word about one of the person who is supposed to be here. i'm not sure that she is here. is terry here? yes. i want to make a special shout out, whose mother was killed on 9/11, and whose voice and courage have inspired congress and me, and the executive branch, both in the bush administration and the obama administration, to act. she is the director of the bipartisan policy center's homeland security project, and her movie, killing in the name, did an extraordinary amount to expose the fact that much of al qaeda's poor is against in a sense muslims. there's lots of big shots and mission, and one of them, a great favorite of mine, bill webster just walked in, but weighing in at 100 pounds, carrie may actually be the heavyweight. so welcome, carrie. welcome to all of you, and welcome to janet napolitano. [applause] >> are you embarrassed? oh, good. that was my intention. okay, madam secretary, let's sta
themselves down. so super storm sandy in the midwest and impact on agriculture, bodleian flyers, the earthquake, tsunami and it clear reactor accident in japan last year, haiti earthquake. the list is long and worrying. in 2011, we had more disasters in the united states costing over a billion dollars. in fact, even more disasters, but not quite as many in 2012. the drought is super storm are hugely expensive. so disasters are happening with greater frequency, greater severity and absolutely with much, much greater cost. so we are here over the next three days to work across traditional boundaries to connect scientists as part tichenor's, with policymakers from the international to the local level, with conservation organization, with corporations and it is our belief that only, i want to emphasize only by working together can we solve these immense challenges that face us. and the costs are not simply financial, but as we tragically know, and many, many lives are lost in these disasters. and so, if we can come up with just one useful idea in the next three days, the benefit, ev
be monitoring, of course the economics comes to bear. we know about hurricane sandy, anybody has an estimate of what the drought of 2012 has cost us so far? the issue is within agriculture alone, the estimate from usda to date is almost $50 billion within agriculture alone. what ends up happening, and don and others could tell you from work done by the national drought mitigation center, is when we ask, well, where are those impacts coming from, the agricultural impacts constituted about 25% of the total number of of reported impacts that we had seen. water resources, energy, wildfire. and one of the things you order in the last discussion and in this one that is the underappreciated aspect of the impacts of drought and air ridty, the loss of ecosystem sources as they support and supply tourism, recreation, clean water and clear air. we do not have any sense of what the costs of those multiple impacts are. we know a bit about the insured impacts from agriculture, but so, therefore, what needs to be considered? the indicators, as margaret is saying, about how people are economically impacted,
responses to the tragedy at not only sandy hook elementary school, but the daily tragedies we see all across america. the nation's mayors and vice president biden have stood together for many, many years in support of public safety. after all, it was then-senator joe biden who championed the crime bill, which established the cops program, and included the ban on assault weapons and large-capacity magazines which congress unfortunately allowed to expire. yesterday i was certainly personally very proud to be in the white house, with president obama and vice president biden, unveiled a strong, comprehensive package, legislative, regulatory reform needed to responsible to the ongoing gun violence in america's cities and suburbs. every day, mayor's -- americas mayors see the carnage from assault weapons. we will make sure that the changes needed to protect our children are made. ladies and gentlemen of the u.s. conference of mayors, please join me in welcoming back our great friend, vice president joe biden. [applause] >> thank you very much. please. please. please be seated. thank you y'all very
sandy hook elementary school, the daily tragedies all across america. the nation's mayors and vice president biden have stood together for many, many years in support of public safety. after all, who has been senator joe biden who champions the crime bill, which established the cops program and included the ban on assault weapons and large capacity magazines as congress unfortunately allowed to expire. yesterday was personally very proud to be in the white house as president obama and vice president biden unveiled a strong, comprehensive package of legislative and regulatory reforms needed to respond to the ongoing gun violence than americans did these and suburbs. every day america's mayors see the carnage caused by illegal guns on assault weapons that have no place on our nation's streets. working with president obama, vice president wright and the congress, we will make sure changes needed to protect our children are made. these and gentlemen of the u.s. conference of mayors, please join me in welcoming back our great friend, vice president joe biden. [applause] >> thank you are
colleagues, sandy grimes, another virginian, who worked with her on the ames task force stepped up to care for jean as she was battling cancer. sandy grimes, a career c.i.a. employee ultimately served as jean's primary caregiver. she sat with her each day during the final three months of her remarkable life. shimon toward jean's care and tried -- she monitored jean's care. she often brought personal messages of support and appreciation from the former c.i.a. colleagues. quote from ms. grimes, "i felt an obligation to be there with her. i can't imagine not doing it. i was the one jean would accept. i owed it to her as a friend." by all accounts, jean vertifay was an intensely private woman and she doubtless would recoil at the attention she is now receiving, but one cannot help but be inspired by this true-life story of service and patriotism and friendship demonstrated by these two great employees: sandy grimes and the late jean vertifay. their services reflect well on the work of thousands of other intelligence professionals whose names can never be revealed. both of them deserve our reco
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19